About your Search

20121101
20121130
STATION
CSPAN2 13
CNNW 12
CNBC 9
CSPAN 8
MSNBCW 7
KCSM (PBS) 4
KNTV (NBC) 3
MSNBC 2
KGO (ABC) 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
KRCB (PBS) 1
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 1
WBAL (NBC) 1
WHUT (Howard University Television) 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 64
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 70 (some duplicates have been removed)
, his efforts are already having an effect. >> in russia, a new law has come into force, requiring organizations that receive funding from abroad to register as foreign agents. dam it conscious of the days of the cold war, and the affected groups are not at all happy about those implications. >> many plan to boycott the law, including an election watchdog. >> this russian election watchdog now has to declare itself a foreign agent because it receives funding from the u.s. and europe. >> it is clear to us that any group that does not register as an agent and is viewed as a nuisance by the state apparatus will be first to be put through the wringer by the authorities. >> the new law passed through parliament during the summer with virtually no public outcry. it is backed by the ruling united russia party, which is allied to president vladimir putin. supporters of the law say it is simply a way to identify groups involved in russian politics who use funds from overseas. >> i do not think it is repression. it is just a way of classifying politically active citizens groups. may be someo
edge -- >> questions to editor she mentioned the cold war. the request and asking what role does russia play in the world going forward. >> it is -- in a challenge of the finding its identity under totally different circumstances. russia has been an imperial power and it has had domestic support by its efforts in asia, the middle east and europe, depending on where it was, now russia has the problem of a declining population. declining russian population and muslim population that is forward of the muslim world. 3,000 miles from china which is based tricky dick nightmare in the sense that there are thirty million russians are on one side and 1 billion chinese on the other end the middle east which is an ideological nightmare and in europe, a historically difficult one for them so how -- and yet the image russia has of its leadership is that they have to be considered as a principal country in order to be taken seriously so fundamentally russia has to look for a pattern of cooperation but found methods of doing it but russia is not strategic to the west, bringing pressure on its neighbor
. not to cross it, because that might bring china into the war. not to do anything to aggravate russia. russia was greedy for any colonies, anything it could grab. and i am not going to give you the atom bomb. you are not going to be able to use it. three things he was told. macarthur said, do not worry, the chinese are not coming in. he got our army up to the 38th parallel. a decision was made. the white house knew -- they decided to cross the parallel to get into north korea and destroy the north korean army. this was an agreed upon decision. we did indeed push back the north koreans. but it triggered the chinese, who came rushing in, hundreds of thousands, truman said, i was promised they would not come in. intelligence told macarthur this would not happen. here we are, fighting hundreds of thousands of chinese. they pushed us all the way back. >> back to seoul? >> beyond. they took seoul back. macarthur started to give press conferences. he asked for the use of the bomb. truman said now. truman did not think -- instead of calling macarthur back, he decided to fly to wake island. he sat wit
to work together. >> we need more than that. we have two ways. putting pressure on russia, china and iran to stop supporting this regime and that's what will be useful or supporting military. or make free zone and no fly zone. >> the japanese government has frozen assets held in japan by assad. it took the action last year. >>> a court in south korea is dealing with a legal matter. it's will decide whether to extradite a chinese national to japan for starting a fire. the site honors japan's war dead including war criminals. tokyo police suspect a fire was set to the gate last december. he already served a ten month pri prison term for throwing four fire bombs at the embassy. officials in china want him sent home for humanitarian reasons. they say he suffers from mental illness. he said he started shrine fire because he was trying to correct their views. he wants to be sent back to china because he says he will not get a fair trial. prosecutors says he does not meet the definition of a political offender. the court has put off its decision until defense witnesses testify in two more rounds
, china, france, germany, russia, known as the p5+1, and the united kingdom have tried to negotiate with iran over its nuclear program. of sides have fumbled the opportunities to reduce the risks of nuclear-armed iran, and to prevent the risk of war, to reduce the risk of war over that nuclear program. since 2007, the u.s. and western intelligence agencies have assessed that iran is nuclear capable, meaning that iran has a scientific, technical and industrial capacity to eventually produce nuclear weapons if it decides to do so. and those intelligence agencies continue to this day to assess that iran has not yet made a decision to do so. intelligence agencies and independent experts also believe that starting from today iran will require several months to acquire enough this'll material for just one bomb and still more time to build a deliverable nuclear weapon. secretary of defense and a estimate it would take two to three years to do so. in the latest international atomic energy agency report, based on its ongoing inspections iran's nuclear facility, particularly the fordo enrichm
killed at least 50 syrian troops. and the diplomatic front, russia says dialogue is the way to peace. >> we fully support the regional quartet initiative that has been launched to resolve the syrian crisis. >> that quartet comprises opponents of the regime. egypt and saudi arabia, as well as syrians ally, iran. calls for dialogue are in directly aimed at the syrian opposition which is meeting to search for greater unity. the national council and opponents within syria itself. hear, the groups under pressure from united states are seeking compromise. >> we will find a way to choose -- they will find a way to choose their leadership. in this case, the owhole world will be behind them. >> there are concerned about losing their influence. still, the hope to come to an agreement with other opposition groups by thursday. the goal, to form one body that would gain recognition in the international community. >> well, the former head of the aerospace is recommending that france used shock therapy to get out of its current economic crisis. >> his proposals include cutting 30 billion euros from
in russia that are bundled up for this next report. >> winter came early to moscow and brought an unusual amount of snow with it. the city dispatched within 10,000 snowplows, but it was not enough. rush-hour traffic backed up for miles and moved at a snail's pace. 50 centimeters of fresh snow are expected by friday. some are pleased. others less so. >> it makes you feel happy. it reminds you of the new year and holidays. >> horrible. i think it is horrible. dirt and pedals everywhere. i do not like it. >> in central europe, things look similar. a cold front is moving from the south and east across germany. in bavaria, slick roads caused morning accidents. meteorologists say temperatures will remain cold and snow will blanket germany by the weekend -- perfect weather to visit the christmas markets. >> speaking of christmas, there is less than a month to go now -- can you believe it? before the holiday. the season would not be complete without the christmas tree at rockefeller center. the mayor himself hit the switch at the ceremony, which drew thousands of spectators. >> it is a tradition
rights group in russia has raised concerns about changes to the country's laws. vladimir putin has signed off amendments that would widen the sentences for high treason and espionage. campaigners say that it will be used to crack down on government critics. europe, now, where millions of people are joining in protest against austerity measures. protests are taking place in spain, greece, portugal, and italy. more action is planned in some of the eastern european union states. in madrid, hundreds of flights have been canceled, doesn't have been arrested after scuffles with police early this morning. our correspondents are following these. good to see you all. let's start with you, chris, in lisbon. what is happening there? >> the streets are fairly quiet, partly because most public transport has been shut down. a lot of the flights here have been cancelled as well. most schools are closed and so are a lot of public offices. we have not seen many demonstrations so far, although we spoke to some union members who had been picketing from the early morning hours this morning. they feel that th
, and he was the richest man in russia. kind of a bad way. and this is what he said to me about oligarchs and everybody else. if the man is not an oligarchic something is not right with him. everyone had the same starting conditions, everyone could have done it. and he really meant it. very heartfelt and not criticizing himself, he lost $100 million, he had stupidly entrusted a non oligarch. and this non oligarchic by definition not a smart guy, a few hundred million dollars. there is a little bit of that thinking a lot of these guys and it is interesting because very strong parallels, the parallel with the industrial revolution. there's a line from andrew carnegie which is very similar soak carnegie said the talent for organization is rare among men, approved by the fact that it is reward for its possessor. if a man is not an oligarch something is wrong with him. and services can be obtained as partner, the man whose service can be obtained as a partner for the first consideration such as render the question of his capital that we are considering. such men soon create capital and in the
. they've removed the stones from his tomb and concealed it off. scientists from france, russia and switzerland are already on site. tomorrow, they will open it. the scientists will remove samples from the body, which will then test independently from one another. some in france, some in russia, some in switzerland, then the remaining remains will be reburied that same day. we are told to expect the results of those tests about four months from now and that is because the manmade very rare form they'll be looking for as a potential murder weapon, it is a half-life of about four months. the kind you find in nature doesn't have that kind of half-life, so if they find it in his body that they're going to take out of the tomb tomorrow, they will need to watch what happens to that over time to know if the radiation was just an environmental thing or if it was murder. other than these two political leaders who may have been killed by plutonium, there are a handful that have been killed by the staff. one was marie curie's daughter. another was the russian spy, alexander -- so, marie cu
efforts to persuade russia d china to work with us at the u.n. security council. i will take every opportunity to urge my russian and chinese colleagues to support the political and diplomatic solution to the conflict in syria. without such a solution everything that they and we most fear is coming closer, including ever-greater loss of life, instability in neighboring countries and an opportunity for extremists to pursue their own ends. the basis for such a political settlement is clear: a credible alternative to the assad regime is emerging that has the growing support of the arab league, the european union, the united states and an in's cooing number -- increasing number of countries, and we have an agreed basis for transition which all permanent members of the u.n. security council signed up to in june. but in the absence of that political and diplomat you can solution, we will not rule out any option, and in accordance with international law where it might save innocent lives in syria and prevent the destabilization of a region that remains critical to the security ofhe united
to the minister to russia, the first minister to russia and he couldn't speak french at the time it was in the language of international diplomacy, it was also the language spoken in the russian court, the russian devotees. francis couldn't speak french. the young john quincy could come in and he asked john adams can they take him with him to st. petersburg as the secretary of the litigation, and at 16 years of age john quincy adams goes up to st. petersburg and spends the year up there. in the wintertime it was too cold to venture out, said john quincy adams on his own had this insatiable appetite for learning on his own he read and studied the date volume history name wind by david hume, the six volumes of edward gibbons to fall in the roman empire and adams met's to volume work on the wealth of nations, the great economic work. he kept studying latin and he read all of the poet's and read cicero and read the english poets. he had a sensational appetite for learning and a 69 was still studying kunkel wrigley. i went to yale instead of harvard. ischemic but i take it as a politi
where it was just the united states and russia, and now i think we have to drain the swamp. there is no other way, a sane way ahead >> you worry about rogue states, of course. you worry about terrorists. you worry about accidents. have you a movie "countdown to zero" which makes this argument in a really compelling way, and it telling the story of one russian man who actually tried to sell nuclear material to al qaeda. >> yes. >> the vignette of that was rather a low level worker in a uranium plant in the former soviet union, and he knew that by taking -- he could secrete very small amounts of highly enriched uranium, and he had a buyer that was a representative al qaeda, and the whole reason that he wanted to sell that was so that he could get a refrigerator. i mean, for him that was what -- that's all it was to him, a means to, you know, make his personal life a little better. >> queen noor, when you look at this and say you want the u.s. to lead the way and russia to lead the way in reducing nuclear arsenals. the counterargument is wait a minute all the bad actors in the
. experts from france, switzerland and russia will examine arafat's remains also looking for a possible pulonium concentration. the samples will be independently analyzed in labs in russia, switzerland and france, and it's unclear when the first results will be made public. in his lifetime, and even after his death, yassir arafat remains a towering figure for palestinians. but despite wanting to know the circumstances behind his illness, not everyone agrees with the exhumation. i don't support the exhumation process, this man says. because the opening of the grave is disrespectful and insulting. >> i have no objection to exhuming him, as long as it is done by professionals and in full respect of the leader. >> reporter: of course, i am against it, he says. it is insulting to the martyr and to the palestinian people. the palestinian authority has accused israel of being behind any poisoning of arafat. a claim the israeli government refuses to comment on. it's not clear if pelonium can be traced eight years after the palestinian leader's death. but if heightened levels are found, the next
the experts from russia, france, and switzerland join the palestinians in taking specimens of yasser arafat's remains. they're going to study those specimens in their laboratories in their countries. they say it will take three months to get a full result. and then they'll know how he died. now the claims that he was murdered, if he was murdered, he was poisoned, became -- well, you know, for eight years, no one really dealt with the issue until al jazeera tv earlier this year did a documentary reporting that they have confirmed that he died of poisoning of plutonium 210, the same allegedly used to kill a spy turned can dissident. if he was poisoned with with mew tone yum, who did it? if it turns out he was poisoned, they need to find out who did it and that's a whole different investigation. i guess it becomes a criminal investigation as opposed to this kind of medical examination. >> and, martin, who is doing this investigation right now? who is in charge of this decision to exhume his body? >> reporter: well, you know, there was great pressure after that al jazeera documentary on arafat'
a couple of hours. what the scientists from russia, france and switzerland and also palestinian doctors did was they opened the grave, they took samples. they didn't even have to extract the body to do that. then they resealed it again. those samples are now going to be independently verified and analyzed in labs in russia, switzerland as well as france. what the palsiestinians tell uss results will be available in three months' time. if poison is found in arafat's remains it would probably cause an uproar in the palestinian territory. for a long time they have been saying israel poisoned the palestinian leader. israel is not even willing to comment on that. even if no poison is found it's hardly going to lay to rest the rumors that arafat was killed. erin? >>> our fifth story "outfront" paula broadwell's next chapter. she has become a tabloid sensation, the woman whose relationship brought down general david petraeus, ending the cia director's storied career. she even made the cover of this week's "people" magazine. yes, it's a great picture. but not a picture she ever wanted to see. so ho
russia, france, switzerland opened the grave, took samples, didn't have to extract the body to do that, and then they resealed it again. the samples will be independently verified and analyzed in labs, russia, switzerland, and france and palestinians are believing they will get results in three months' time, of course, if p l pulonium is found, it will caused an uproar. they have been saying israel poisoned the palestinian leader. even if no poison is found, it will hardly lay to rest the rumors. >>> our fifth story "outfront," paula broadwell's next chapter. she ended david petraeus' career. she made the cover of "people" magazine "sex, lies, and spies." a great picture, but not one she ever wanted to see. what is her next move? suzanne kelly, intelligence correspondent, and spoke with broadwell's brother today. what did he have to say? >> we were told that she is really focused right now on restoring the trust between her and her husband and trying to protect her two sons from all of the publicity that has come along with the public outing of the affair. they have put out very diffe
to climb out from under russia's thumb and sign a deal with a new gas partner. okay. this deal was a big deal. over $1 billion and what it was going to do was have the company build a new port terminal on the black sea for importing and exporting liquefied natural gas. the signing of the agreement was such a big deal in the ukraine it was televised. it was attended by the prime minister and by a man called jordy sarda bonvehi representing the company. huge step toward energy independence and a big bird to russia. one big problem. the company doesn't know anything about it. turns out that jordy doesn't actually work for that company. he's the bald gentleman in this shot. take a good look at this guy. we don't know what his real name is. it appears he's a con man who was able to get through multiple rounds and rounds and rounds of negotiations and a televised appearance for a $1 billion deal without detection. i mean, that's kind of incredible. you have got to give the guy that. in fact, on the surface, this seems like a mirror image of one of the most infamous swindles in history, when vi
enough. they are going to climb out from under russia's thumb and sign a deal with a new gas partner. okay. this was such a big deal, it was televised and attended by a man representing finosa. a big bird to russia. it was just one big problem. gas natural finosa didn't know anything about it. it turns out that he doesn't actually work for that company. he's the bold gentleman in this shot. take a good look at this guy. we actually don't know what his real name is. it appears he's a con man who was able to get through multiple rounds and rounds and rounds of negotiation and a televised appearance for a billion dollar deal without detection. i mean, that's kind of incredible. you have got to give the guy that. in fact, on the surface, this seemed like a mirror image of one of the most infamous swindles in history, when victor lustig sold the eiffel tower to two company. years later, he even pulled a scandal on al capone. yes, he swindled al capone out of $5,000 in money. how's that for inflation in that takes a lot of brass and a lot of smarts, which is something that our new con man
earnings come true. russia is selling at six times next year's earnings. china and russia would be another if this broad picture that you're talking about. you want top own some emerging markets. master limited partnerships. high-grade bonds. >> are you worried about taxes going higher on dividends and cap gains in 2013? does that cut into the reason to buy stocks? >> i think many people say it has no effect. you can go from 15% to 43%. at the margin, that can influence people. this is why you want to basically find these company that have a defensive characteristic and where you are getting enough yield so when you lose the dividend, you have some income. corporations are buying cash. banks are buying liquidity. central banks are buying government bonds. foundations and endowments and pension funds are buying alternatives. individuals are buying bonds. rich individuals are buying jewelry, art, and trophy real estate. nobody is buying stocks in a big way right now. >> and yet morgan stanley for 2013 has come out with a more optist ism optimistic call for the s&p. what's the optimism? >> we
-day for palladium, supply concerns out of russia and south africa, also supportive of the platinum market. if you want to play these metals as a retail investors, look at the etfs. >>> to the action here at the nyse, bob pisani here on the nyse floor. last words out of your mouth were much better that yesterday. what kind of steady as she goes? >> even on the vans decline line. volume is light to moderate a heck of a lot better that yesterday. best volume in a long time. and a very strong european close. that was the big factor, big speculation again about spain being involved in perhaps the ecb coming and buying spam nish bonds, all vague speculation but helped the spam nish close and the european close. here is sector up today for the first time this month, utility stocks. they have been slammed on speculation on the fiscal cliff, of course, dividend payers have to pay higher taxes, the first time, sue, in nine trading sessions, the utilities on the upside a lot of the big utility names you see down 7, 8%. some of this, some of it is due to hurricane sandy but much on speculation on the fiscal
german soldiers in vast numbers were being sent to russia to die. when the germans vendorred and -- surrenders, the american propensity to save dear human lives while wasting cheap bullets and bombs reached its zenith with the dropping of the two atomic bombs. vir culley all -- virtually all of the relevant evidence, recent evidence from both american and japanese sources validates president harry truman's decision to drop both bombs. japanese leaders did not display the slightest acknowledgment of military reality illustrated i be a report of japan's top atomic scientist who was sent down to hiroshima the following day, and he had to report back to the emperor, and he was asked, was this an atomic bomb? yeah, it's an atomic bomb. then came the line, how long til we can make one? that's hardly the response of somebody looking for a way to surrender. truman intended to show japan that he would use any weapon at our disposal. there was no atomic diplomacy. he wanted to show the japanese that it was surrender or die. with japan's surrender came the temporary victory of the princ
cost investments. ♪ >>> a couple other stories we're following this morning, russia's space agency has denied it lost communication with the international space station after a cable broke outside moscow. the story was first reported on state run news agency saying the broken kibl meant russia had lost the ability to control most of its civilian satellites. a spokesman was quick to assure that despite the broken cable, satellites and the station were continuing to operate normally. he also said the agency was able to communicate with the satellites and control them. plenty more coverage on this story at cnbc.com. further israeli strikes have killed three palestinians in the southern gaza strip this as three were killed in an auntment building in central israel, the first israeli fatalities since israel relaunched an offensive against gaza a day earlier. and the latest action came as the u.n. security council held an emergency meeting in new york to discuss the escalation of violence in the region. yesterday israel killed hamas' top military commander during air strikes. condemnation of
to be happening. so what's going to happen is that this coming tuesday the investigators from france, russia, as well as switzerland, are going to open yasser arafat's grave. they are going to take samples from yasser arafat ebody, and then they are going to shut the grave as well. all of this will have big ceremonial character. there will be a religious ceremony when the grave is opened. there will be a military ceremony, and the same is going to be happening when yasser arafat is laid to rest again. the whole thing, they say, is all going to happen in one day, so it won't take very long, but what the palestinian authority has left open is how long the actual investigation of the samples is going to take. all of the samples are separately going to be taken to russia, france and switzerland, to the labs there, to be analyzed, and it's unclear how long this analysis is going to take. however, if it does come to light that yasser arafat was indeed poisoned with the radioactive substance polonium that will, of course, cause massive emotional reactions here. and already the investigation is a ve
be effective adversely. the dependence of europe and russia and is that necessary? secondly, ongoing arrangements generated over the last two or three decades, largely by an american strategy designed to diminish your independence in russian energy. i play the general rule in georgia and providing access in the near future, is something that i'm sure some russians would like to undercut. so even without a massive outbreak of violence in the region and escalating clinton's and explosions, that would have consequences. very adverse to europe and to the united states. these partners in the negotiating process are motivated the same way as we are, on the part of some individuals, i'm not saying this is the official russian point of view, but some individuals in russia were strategists and might take themselves that we are really sure [inaudible] two that's interesting but let me play devil's advocate for a second. containment, in essence, it's on the brink of war. when the russians were those who may have different interest still be able to achieve some of those objectives when it comes
stands on russia and china and iran where he says president obama should have backed the iranian democracy movement and imposed tougher sanctions on iran sooner. >> in my opinion, the president's mistakes on iran are in part responsible for the fact that iran is closer to a nuclear weapon today than it was when he was elected. >> the one word i would use to describe his foreign policy would be tough minded. >> and on august 11th, 2012, in norfolk, virginia, the final piece of the romney campaign falls into place. >> president obama promised to begin to slow the rise of the oceans. and to heal the planet. my promise is to help you and your family. >> with the nomination in hand >> this is not about me. it's not about him. this is about america, the country we love. it's in trouble. it needs our help. >> come november 6th, the american voters will make their decision. >> thank you so much.
and the arab world. experts from switzerland, france and russia will test the sample. it could take months for the results to come back and then even, the mystery may not be resolved. polonium decays quickly. even if he was murdered, it may never be known. rita nissan for cbs news. >>> music and candlelight at san francisco city hall tonight as friends and families remember two slain city leaders. today marks the 34th anniversary of the assassinations of mayor george moscone and supervisor harvey milk. the memorial kicked off earlier this afternoon with a ceremony on the steps of city hall. these are live pictures now of a candlelight march from city hall to milk's old camera store in san francisco's castro district. the tradition of a commemoration began with a spontaneous candlelight march and vigi on the night of the assassination in 1978. >>> the men accused of beating giants fan bryan stow nearly to death outside of dodger stadium could go to trial early next year. the defense is still reviewing thousands of pages of evidence in the case against louie sanchez and marvin norwood. they
. now a team scientists from russia, switzerland and france will try and determine if the poisoning was the underlying cause of death. if ingested a quantity of the it can am deadly. it destroys dna, the immune system and major organs. but detection, it's not that simple. the drug dekays quickly. losing its radioactive in 2 1/2 years. remember, arafat now has been dead for eight years. scientists anding his remains say it will take at least three months before they have any results and those results could be inconclusive. yasser arafat, he was controversial in life and he remains so now in death. shep. >> shepard: david lee miller in jerusalem. powerball fever has the winning jackpot topping half a billion dollars tonight. lottery officials say it's likely to get bigger. as for your chances of winning, well, we'll crunch those numbers next. plus, don't want to put your aging parents in a nursing home, right? so why not just let them live in the backyard? we'll have that for you just ahead ♪ [ engine revs ] ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] the mercedes-benz winter event is back, with the
, look, we have the leaders of france and britain and china and russia and the u.n. and we're trying to prevent nuclear weapons, you know, you should probably not meddle in this. that's a winnable argument. i think particularly coming out of this -- obama out of a strong election. no one like gaddafi. no one liked libya. no one liked the soviets. it's doable. >> to partially answer the same question. the issue for many in congress is whether this negotiation quote-unquote allows iran to continue enriching at the 3.5% level or not. the historical position of the united states going back to the early 2000's has been that there should be a suspension of all enrichment as a confidence-building measure. from what you're saying, jim, we're well past that point and iran has a lot of truth on the ground in terms of additional centrifuges and they want the -- their so-called right under the nonproliferation treaty to be recognized. the question is at what level do they continue. >> i think there's also -- i agree with that. i want to go on here. there is a debate over countries have the right
. if you go to russia and you put on discovery, it's putin's favorite channel. the people in russia think it is a russian channel so one, our content works really well but it's not just discovery. animal planet also universal, almost 90% of our -- when we develop a show for animal planet we take it everywhere in the world. i.d. as i mentioned has been very successful for us. it's a top ten network in america. in the last nine months we've launched it in over 130 countries. >> "honey boo boo" is not on france. >> tlc is a little different. animal planet, science, discovery, and now i.d., that content works. so we really have a different economic model. if we invest in a show like "gold rush" or we invest in a show with david salmani on animal planet, who will be here in a few minutes or susan lucci we take those shows around the world. those nichz, science is universal. tlc is more difficult. we have to do local content with tlc because it feels like an american channel. >> david is our guest host. we've been asking ceos and business leaders how they are planning for the end of the year wi
after a sudden and severe illness. doctors from france, switzerland, and russia are going to take their own samples for independent analysis. authorities said high levels of the substance was found on araphats personal belongings. >> the fire that killed more than 100 textile workers by sabotage according to the bangladesh government. the worst ever industrial fire broke out on saturday and consumed in multistory factor. the interior minister said in a claccording to the investigation the fire was arson. >> coming up on the kron for a morning news we are following a developing story out of san francisco with the axis to and from treasure island on interstate 80 are closed due to a police standoff with an armed man. >> 0ñ@Ñ ♪ secondhand smoke affects everyone's health. it's not just irritating. it can cause heart disease and even death. speak up about secondhand smoke. your health and the health of your family depend on it. welcome back. the time the4:30. we are following a developing story on treasure island with the on demand. we're live at the embarcadero with more. >> good
in the russians had behaved, i don't think we can give up on russia because they do know the syrian military there in getting bashar al-assad out of the country is not going to solve all the problems. if he leaves, particularly if he were to leave tomorrow, let's say, you would have fragmentation in syria for both sides this is an existential struggle. and alawite dominated army is not going to give up because bashar gave up. and the competition is not going to lay down their arms because bashar less. so i think we very much, if there's going to be any hope for resolution that keeps syria impact for the time being we need the russians, and we need putin, and we need them to recognize that their nihilistic attitude right now doesn't play well. and i would suggest that a number of countries might do better by putting pressure on russia rather than excoriating the united states. i do believe in military intervention. i think we could very well find ourselves backing one side and then only to find that we're incapable of stopping them from occurring the other side if they defeat them. we've seen
of the palestinian leader's belongings. now experts from france, switzerland and russia will examine arafat's remains, also looking for a possible concentration. the process will only take a few hours but samples will then be independently analyzed in labs in russia, switzerland and france and it's unclear when the first results will be made public. in his lifetime, and even after his death, yaszer arafat remains a powering figure for palestinians. but denight wanting to know the circumstances behind his illness, not everyone agrees with the exhumation. >> translator: i don't support the process this man says because the opening of the grave is disrespectful and insulting. >> i have no objection to exhuming him as long as it is done by professionals and in full respect of the leader. >> of course i'm against it, he says. it is insulting to martyr and to the palestinian people. >> reporter: the palestinian authority accused israel of being behind poisoning of arafat, a claim the israeli government refuses to comment on. it is not clear if it can be traced on the remains eight years after the palestini
, it has 2 million views, 400,000 likes and 28,000 comments and passed from romania to russia to china. and the officer himself came forward. he is lawrence deprimo, an unfailingly polite 25-year-old who still lives with his mom and dad. >> so i went up to him and i was like, buddy, where's your socks, where's your shoes? he said, i never had a pair of socks or shoes, officer, but god bless you. i knew right then i needed to help him. >> reporter: when you presented him with the boots what was his reaction? >> he couldn't believe it. he was this is too much officer. god bless you, be safe, everything. like i said, almost like you gave him $1 million. >> reporter: officer deprimo doesn't know anything about the man he helped or what's become of him, but he keeps the receipt for the $75 he spent on the boots in his bulletproof vest, a reminder for all of us about the pervasiveness of need and potential for compassion. dan harris, abc new, new york. >> just a pure act of kindness. >> and he heard -- just before he got the boots, he heard someone chuckle at the homeless guy on the street.
trying to broker a truce in gaza. that includes the u.n., russia, the eu and the united states. >>> and this story here developing every minute. stay with cnn, of course, and cnn.com for updates throughout the morning and throughout the day here on cnn. >>> now to the latest on the investigation into benghazi. who knew what and when? the spokesman for the director of national intelligence says the intelligence community, not the white house, state department or the justice department made substantive changes to talking points given to government officials. the obama administration especially u.n. ambassador susan rice has taken a lot of heat over those talking points. rice used them as a basis for comments she made on sunday talk shows five days after the deadly attack. >>> indianapolis detectives say recent explosion at an area subdivision was no accident. this homicide investigation now is under way. two people were killed. seven others injured. back on november 10th in this blast that just leveled -- look at these pictures -- leveled several homes, damaged more than 30 other
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 70 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)